[By Alexandria Horvat-Becevello]

As PR professionals we must always be quick on our feet. Whether it be managing a crisis or presenting a new idea, communicators must be ready for anything, at any time. With that said, many people stumble into situations promoting inaccuracies and not acknowledging the transgressions on truth ‘spinning’. Here are 3 things every PR professional can learn from “alternative facts”:

Make connections, don’t break them.
Creating long-lasting connections and relationships within the industry is an exercise that PR professionals engage in throughout their careers. Regardless of what path you pursue, building relationships with journalists and the media is a crucial part of the job. Breaking those connections by claiming false information or targeting an individual directly is a sure way to give you and your client a bad rep and leave a sour taste in the mouth of your audience.

Own up to your mistakes.
Remember when you were a kid and you blamed someone else for something you did to avoid repercussions? Being an adult makes it more difficult to act like a five-year-old in addition to being professionally unacceptable. When a situation spirals downward, taking initiative and acknowledging your mistakes are what is expected from communications professionals. As a communicator, it is important to demonstrate that you are able to identify your own errors and find a solution. Blaming others for your wrongdoings or skirting the issue is a quick way to lose the respect of your peers and most importantly your clients.

Be credible.
As a PR professional, you will frequently engage with the public on behalf of your client. Truth and honesty should go hand in hand as a communicator. As a representative of an organization, you want to be the person your audience can rely on for facts, not falsehoods. Earning the trust of the public and people in the industry is a crucial part of your success. Although creating a respected name for yourself and your client(s) takes time and patience, the payoff is worth the effort.

(Photo by PDPics via Pixabay)

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